Posts Tagged ‘marcos lopez’

Demolición. Three Argentine Photographers

November 14, 2012

Marcos López, Tía Delia, Santa Fé, 1992

There is a current show up in Buenos Aires called, Demolición. En pos de una fotografía ¿argentina? It features three Argentine photographers, Alberto Goldenstein, Marcos Lopez, and Ataulfo Perez Aznar and was the brainchild of Guillermo Ueno whose class I took a few years ago at the Centro Cultural Rojas.

I post about this show mostly because I came across a post on the blog, RƎV: Imagenes de Arte Contemporanea en Argentina which shows a very good selection of installation shots of the show. The blog is written by the indomintable Gabriela Schevach, artist, photographer and writer. I will definitely be adding it to my blog reader (does anyone use those anymore?).

Selva Virgen at Casa Inmobiliaria in Lima, Peru

July 26, 2012

I have some photos up in a group show in Lima called Selva Virgen, Salvaje y Sensual. It’s currently up at the Casa Inmobiliaria located on Javier Prado Oeste and Los Castanos (on the off chance you’re in Lima). The title translates as “Virgin Jungle: Salvage and Sensual.” The photos mostly deal with the culture and people of the  Amazon region in Peru. In the rest of Peru, the region and especially it’s largest city Iquitos is perceived as sensual and libertine, a sort of Brazil-in-Peru. A lot of the photos in the exhibit deal with this one way or another.

Here’s the promo card for the exhibit:

Selva Virgen promo image

The show features ten photographers and two painters. It was curated by the painter Christian Bendayan who is from Iquitos and whom I’ve blogged about before. It’s a real honor to be included in this group and my only regret is not being able to be in Lima to check it out. Fortunately, thanks to Facebook, I’ve been able to piece together some random shots, which I’ll share here to give you a sense of the show.

Casa Inmobiliaria, site of Selva Virgen show in Lima, Peru (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

The show is housed in a old mansion that will be demolished soon for a luxury high rise. In the meantime, the space is functioning as an art exhibition space (and sales office). Back in March, when I was in Lima, I blogged about a show there called Miscelanea (todo se queda en casa).

Here’s some work by the different photographers in the show:

Adrian Portugal

Adrian Portugal (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Adrian Portugal of Supay Fotos, features images of female dancers and it looks like they are over-painted with black-light paint. This neon paint is used a lot in popular bars and discos in Iquitos.

Adrian Portugal (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

(photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

I love the way the paint drips off this photo and glows under the UV light. Again, it’s a shame I can’t go to the show.

Antonio Escalante

Antonio Escalante shows photographs of older women (maybe prostitutes?) in dark interior spaces. In addition to the photos, I like the frames and the colorful wallpaper. In general, there was a lot of thought put into the presentation of the photos and the use of the space.

Antonio Escalante (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Antonio Escalante (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Sandro Aguilar has pictures of naked women in the forest and a few pictures taken with a holga that I quite like. I’d love to see more but he doesn’t seem to have a website. Update: he does have a website.

Sandro Aguilar

Sandro Aguilar (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Sandro Aguilar (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Rodrigo Rodrich photographs various indigenous groups in the forest with a softbox. I believe these were originally for a magazine assignment. They are nice group arrangements. I think photographing groups is next to impossible so I always appreciate it when I see it done well.

Rodrigo Rodrich

Rodrigo Rodrich (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Musuk Nolte shows very expressive, black and white pictures of boys with water splashing all around them. I seem to recall these having something to do with the insane asylum in Iquitos, but I may be confusing these with other photographs.

Musuk Nolte (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Musuk Nolte (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Gihan Tubbeh’s photos feature female erotic dancers.

Gihan Tubbeh (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Marcos Lopez, from Argentina, features several photographs from the main cemetery in Iquitos, altho it looks like they were instead painted on the wall for the exhibit, which looks really cool.

Marcos Lopez

Marcos Lopez (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Morfi Jimenez does black and white portraits, often with flash, which he then colors-in, in the mode of Felice Beato or Jan Saudek (the promo-card image for the show is his).

Morfi Jimenez (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Here’s a gallery of Jimenez’s Iquitos images (since they don’t seem to be on his website).

Carlos Sanchez Giraldo is showing this series of three, round panels that look like they are painted. Sanchez also organized the Retratos Pintados show that I really liked back in March.

Carlos Sanchez Giraldo (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Carlos Sanchez Giraldo

I’m in the show too 🙂

This is actually my first curated group show, so I’m really pleased. The work and the installations look amazing. I’m just sad I can’t be in Lima to see the show. I’m showing a selection of portraits that I made last year in Iquitos.

My photos (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

My photos (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Carlos below his photo (courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

That’s Carlos, one of the guys I photographed, standing below his photo in the show. He lives in Lima now, so he was able to attend the opening (and post a lot of these pictures to Facebook, not to mention give me permission to post them here). I haven’t put any of this work up on my website yet. I was in Iquitos again this year and made a ton more portraits which I haven’t been able to scan yet. I do have the photos from last year scanned but I’ve been waiting to do a more final edit. Still, here’s a few of my portraits that were in the show.

Carlos

Roger

Christian

Here’s a full list of the participating photographers (with links, where I found them): Antonio Escalante, Musuk Nolte, Adrián Portugal, Morfi Jimenez, Rodrigo Rodrich, Marcos López, Gihan Tubbeh, Sandro Aguilar, José Ashuco Araujo, Carlos Sánchez Giraldo and Luis Sakiray.

Report from Buenos Aires Photo 2011

October 30, 2011

This weekend is the annual photography fair here, Buenos Aires Photo. I went on Friday and snapped a bunch of pictures of stuff I liked. Here’s a brief report:

The fair takes places at the Palais de Glace, a building in Recoleta from Argentina’s golden era. It originally housed an ice-skating rink [in 1911] and today features a rotating schedule of art fairs and exhibits. The architecture of the building is fascinating.

Buenos Aires Photo at Palais de Glace

Buenos Aires Photo at Palais de Glace

It’s cool to dis art fairs like this because they’re very commercial and filled with mediocre crap. While true, I go anyway because I always discover stuff I like, even stuff that blows me away.

One of the things I like the most about this fair [and other photography fairs I’ve been to] is the amount of vintage black & white prints by long established [or long dead] masters. If you happened to have missed so-and-so’s retrospective in 1987 [or whenever] these fairs are basically your only shot and seeing beautiful, vintage, black & white prints.

Wall featuring vintage prints by Anatole Saderman, Annemarie Heinrich, Alex Klein, Grete Stern, Juan Di Sandro, and Fred Schiffer

Vintage print by Pierre Verger

A while back I wrote a post about Pierre Verger. I love his photos.

Oscar Pintor is a classic of Argentine photography. Active in the 1970s and 1980s mostly, his black & white photos have a balance of dry-ness and romanticism. My friend Emma commented that they seem very contemporary. I think I’ll need to write a post just about his photos. They’re that awesome.

Oscar Pintor prints

Aldo Sessa is equal parts Annie Leibovitz and Ansel Adams. He makes big, technically perfect photographs of obvious subjects, utterly lacking in soul. He produces massive coffee table books featuring tango dancers and gauchos. For most people in Argentina, outside of the photo-ghetto, Sessa IS photography. He has his own vanity-gallery at this year’s fair, and, believe it or not, I was actually taken with a small set of color photographs of the industrial side of Buenos Aires taken in the late 1950s [take that Eggleston!].

Aldo Sessa, early color

Aldo Sessa, early color

There’s a group of photos documenting artistic actions by conceptual artist Luiz Pazos, from 1973. They look like they were a lot of fun to make. 1973 was an interesting year for Argentina. Perón was elected again as president after 18 years of exile. There was a brief flowering of arts and culture that was snuffed out in 1976 following the militar coup.

Luiz Pazos

Perhaps my favorite photo in the entire fair was this one by Roberto Riverti. Taken in 1987 in the rural city of Chascomus, it’s a night photograph of an old cinema showing a double bill of Back to the Future and D.C. Cab [starring Mr. T!!]

Roberto Riverti, movie theatre in Chascomus

Then, of course, there’s a lot of contemporary stuff in color.

Marcos Lopez

I once read a quote by Marcos Lopez stating something to the effect that he can only make images in Latin America. I was interested, then, to see these photos, made this year in Lithuania. The photos are pared down from the high-baroque style of Lopez’s recent photos, but still recognizably Marcos.

res

A very large photo by res of an abstract color pattern painted on the side of a shack in a shantytown.

Santiago Porter

Santiago Porter’s giant photo shows the ever-so-slight inclination in the generally very flat pampas landscape. I’ve been sort of fascinated lately with flatness in landscape photography. I’m reminded of this quote from Charles Darwin’s Voyage of the Beagle:

For many leagues north and south…the country is really level. Scarcely anything which travelers have written about its extreme flatness can be considered as exaggeration…. At sea, a person’s eye being six feet above the surface of the water, his horizon is two miles and four-fifths distant. In like manner, the more level the plain, the more nearly does the horizon approach within these narrow limits; and this, in my opinion, entirely destroys that grandeur which one would have imagined that a vast level plain would have possessed.

With Porter’s photograph, we don’t even get that far because it’s shrouded in fog.

Emma Livingston

Emma Livingston’s lovely tree portraits.

Esteban Pastorino

A kite photograph by Esteban Pastorino. He builds his own cameras and has a bunch of cool projects.

Guido Chouela

A nocturnal ochava by Guido Chouela. He’s got an interesting series of factories that I’ve been meaning to blog about for awhile.

Hans Stoll

Peruvian photographer Hans Stoll shares my fascination with Buenos Aires rooftops.

Daniela Trajtenberg

Interesting still lifes by Daniel Trajtenberg.

Sebastian Desbats

Sebastian Desbats does these retrofuturistic photos involving rocks, sea water and objects suggestive of space ships.

Roberto Huarcaya

Roberto Huarcaya, detail

Roberto Huarcaya’s panoramic photo depicts the divide in economic class on Lima’s outskirts between a gated community ringed with barbed wire and the humble houses on the other side. A similar panorama, showing a public and private beach, won last year’s Petrobras prize, which is an important prize given annually as part of the fair.

This year the prize went to Eduardo Gil and Nacho Iasparra who won 1st and 2nd place, respectively. They are the two photographers here in Argentina I’ve been taking workshops with for the last two years, so this was very exciting.

Eduardo Gil

Nacho Iasparra

Here’s a list of 2011 honorable mentions for the Petrobras prize. For me the winner of the nicest prints goes to Martin Weber’s color work.

Martin Weber

Martin Weber

Both of these photos come from Weber’s series Echoes from the Interior. I love the subject matter and the quality of his prints is stunning. Good printing is starting to seem like a lost art.

Finally, one of my favorite things was this small side exhibit by Eduardo Carrera. Called naturaleza it features photos of potted plans, girls and zoo animals. While this sounds random, I found it really worked well together and had this whimsical grace about it. It was a nice relief to the bombast of so much of the large work one sees at fairs like this.

Eduardo Carrera

Eduardo Carrera

I really like Carrera’s work in general, especially his series Verano Porteño, which I’ve blogged about before.

And that’s about it. I went during the afternoon and the place was empty. I felt like I had the whole place to myself and it let me really see all the stands. The low attendance probably had something to do with the glorious spring weather here in Buenos Aires at the moment.

Primavera Porteña

Only a geek like me would choose to spend a sunny afternoon like this in a dark hall looking at photographs. I loved it, though.

Marcos Lopez – Urban Landscapes

September 20, 2010

© Marcos Lopez

© Marcos Lopez

© Marcos Lopez

© Marcos Lopez

© Marcos Lopez

Marcos Lopez is one of the best known and most successful contemporary photographers in Argentina. The style of his best known works reminds me of David LaChapelle; big, colorful, over-the-top tableaux of iconic imagery in Latin America. I recently rediscovered his Urban Landscapes series. For this he simply went out into the suburbs of Buenos Aires and his native Santa Fe province and photographed stuff he found. Nuestra Mirada has a good interview with Lopez [in English].  My thanks to Sergio Miranda for reminding me of this series.

Daniel Merle’s Camera Porn Videos

November 9, 2009

Daniel Merle is the photo editor for La Nacion’s Sunday magazine and he also writes the best [the only?] blog on photography in Argentina. I enjoy reading his blog [in Spanish] because he writes in a very conversational style that I find easy to read. Of course, I also enjoy what he writes about. Recently he’s been producing these wonderful short videos of well-known photographers here in Argentina talking about what cameras they use and why. I realize that the camera does not make the photographer, still, I’m a complete camera porn fetishist and total voyeur when it comes to watching other photographers at work, so these videos are a joy to watch [in Spanish]:

Juan Travnik

Alberto Goldenstein [I’m currently taking a workshop with Alberto at the Centro Cultural Rojas]

Marcos Lopez. This video is amusing because Sr. Lopez doesn’t actually own any cameras. Like a lot of commercial photographers, he rents what he needs [he’s also fun to listen to].