Archive for July, 2012

Selva Virgen at Casa Inmobiliaria in Lima, Peru

July 26, 2012

I have some photos up in a group show in Lima called Selva Virgen, Salvaje y Sensual. It’s currently up at the Casa Inmobiliaria located on Javier Prado Oeste and Los Castanos (on the off chance you’re in Lima). The title translates as “Virgin Jungle: Salvage and Sensual.” The photos mostly deal with the culture and people of the  Amazon region in Peru. In the rest of Peru, the region and especially it’s largest city Iquitos is perceived as sensual and libertine, a sort of Brazil-in-Peru. A lot of the photos in the exhibit deal with this one way or another.

Here’s the promo card for the exhibit:

Selva Virgen promo image

The show features ten photographers and two painters. It was curated by the painter Christian Bendayan who is from Iquitos and whom I’ve blogged about before. It’s a real honor to be included in this group and my only regret is not being able to be in Lima to check it out. Fortunately, thanks to Facebook, I’ve been able to piece together some random shots, which I’ll share here to give you a sense of the show.

Casa Inmobiliaria, site of Selva Virgen show in Lima, Peru (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

The show is housed in a old mansion that will be demolished soon for a luxury high rise. In the meantime, the space is functioning as an art exhibition space (and sales office). Back in March, when I was in Lima, I blogged about a show there called Miscelanea (todo se queda en casa).

Here’s some work by the different photographers in the show:

Adrian Portugal

Adrian Portugal (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Adrian Portugal of Supay Fotos, features images of female dancers and it looks like they are over-painted with black-light paint. This neon paint is used a lot in popular bars and discos in Iquitos.

Adrian Portugal (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

(photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

I love the way the paint drips off this photo and glows under the UV light. Again, it’s a shame I can’t go to the show.

Antonio Escalante

Antonio Escalante shows photographs of older women (maybe prostitutes?) in dark interior spaces. In addition to the photos, I like the frames and the colorful wallpaper. In general, there was a lot of thought put into the presentation of the photos and the use of the space.

Antonio Escalante (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Antonio Escalante (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Sandro Aguilar has pictures of naked women in the forest and a few pictures taken with a holga that I quite like. I’d love to see more but he doesn’t seem to have a website. Update: he does have a website.

Sandro Aguilar

Sandro Aguilar (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Sandro Aguilar (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Rodrigo Rodrich photographs various indigenous groups in the forest with a softbox. I believe these were originally for a magazine assignment. They are nice group arrangements. I think photographing groups is next to impossible so I always appreciate it when I see it done well.

Rodrigo Rodrich

Rodrigo Rodrich (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Musuk Nolte shows very expressive, black and white pictures of boys with water splashing all around them. I seem to recall these having something to do with the insane asylum in Iquitos, but I may be confusing these with other photographs.

Musuk Nolte (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Musuk Nolte (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Gihan Tubbeh’s photos feature female erotic dancers.

Gihan Tubbeh (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Marcos Lopez, from Argentina, features several photographs from the main cemetery in Iquitos, altho it looks like they were instead painted on the wall for the exhibit, which looks really cool.

Marcos Lopez

Marcos Lopez (photo courtesy of guiame.pe)

Morfi Jimenez does black and white portraits, often with flash, which he then colors-in, in the mode of Felice Beato or Jan Saudek (the promo-card image for the show is his).

Morfi Jimenez (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Here’s a gallery of Jimenez’s Iquitos images (since they don’t seem to be on his website).

Carlos Sanchez Giraldo is showing this series of three, round panels that look like they are painted. Sanchez also organized the Retratos Pintados show that I really liked back in March.

Carlos Sanchez Giraldo (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Carlos Sanchez Giraldo

I’m in the show too 🙂

This is actually my first curated group show, so I’m really pleased. The work and the installations look amazing. I’m just sad I can’t be in Lima to see the show. I’m showing a selection of portraits that I made last year in Iquitos.

My photos (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

My photos (photo courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

Carlos below his photo (courtesy of Carlos Pacaya)

That’s Carlos, one of the guys I photographed, standing below his photo in the show. He lives in Lima now, so he was able to attend the opening (and post a lot of these pictures to Facebook, not to mention give me permission to post them here). I haven’t put any of this work up on my website yet. I was in Iquitos again this year and made a ton more portraits which I haven’t been able to scan yet. I do have the photos from last year scanned but I’ve been waiting to do a more final edit. Still, here’s a few of my portraits that were in the show.

Carlos

Roger

Christian

Here’s a full list of the participating photographers (with links, where I found them): Antonio Escalante, Musuk Nolte, Adrián Portugal, Morfi Jimenez, Rodrigo Rodrich, Marcos López, Gihan Tubbeh, Sandro Aguilar, José Ashuco Araujo, Carlos Sánchez Giraldo and Luis Sakiray.

Medellin Snapshots

July 9, 2012

I’m leaving Medellin today after a nearly six week stay. I’m dying to get my medium format rolls developed. In the meantime, here are some snapshots with my digital camera from my wanderings around Medellin.

The city sits in a narrow valley with neighborhoods climbing both sides, quite high. After the flatness of Buenos Aires, I find the topography of the city fascinating.

Metrocable to La Aurora

This is a very postcard-y picture of the cable car leading to La Aurora on the eastern side of the city. A lot of the neighborhoods climbing the hillsides are impoverished and have difficult access. Medellin is the first city in the world to use cable cars as mass transit (Caracas, with a similiar topography, is now also using them). I had to post this picture because as a child I used to fantasize about cable cars being used as mass transit (I was a very geeky child). These cable cars are probably the coolest thing about Medellin.

Overhead noon-day sun in Medellin

The hottest thing about the city is the noon-day equatorial sun. Being at 5000ft. above sea level does take some edge off the heat but the sun striking directly down from overhead is intense. The city is just 6 degrees north of the equator and I find there’s something odd and not at all photogenic about the way things look in this kind of light. Trying to find interesting ways to photograph under these conditions has been a challenge (one that I’ve mostly failed).

Botanical garden on a sunny day

Like most places I go, I like the regular architecture and decoration of houses in middle-class neighborhoods.

House in Las Granjas

House in Belen

The rich neighborhood is called El Poblado. It’s one side of the valley with brick apartment high rises climbing far up the side of the mountain. It’s sort of this neo-liberal hell whose residents think they’re in heaven. It’s all mega-apartment complexes meant to be driven into or out-of but the road infrastructure is so poor that you spend 30 minutes in traffic just to get to the supermarket. Still, the views are interesting. You’re often somewhere in the middle with buildings above and buildings below with no clear sense of where the ground is. I like that.

El Poblado

And finally, I’ve been photographing a lot at dusk. I’ve been taking two pictures of the same view separated by 15 minutes, like I did for my Pulmones project in Buenos Aires. It’s a really simple device but I like the effect. Plus it’s been a good goal to try to find myself someplace interesting every night at 6:20pm (the time of sunset doesn’t vary a lot. We’re close to the equator).

Dusk, La Aurora

Dusk, Calasanz Alta

Dusk, Las Esmeraldas

And here’s the full set on flickr.